Tag Archives: Volunteer

How to Organize a Fall Festival for Your HOA or Condo Association


https://i0.wp.com/pumpkins.yellow-dog-publishing.com/images/pumpkin.jpg

Many Homeowners Associations plan fall festivals. Some celebrate the end of the harvest, while others use a fall festival to provide a safe alternative to traditional Halloween trick-or-treating. Whatever the reason for thecommunity activity, with a little bit of planning the festival can be a lot of fun for all home owners.

Instructions

    • 1

      Decide who is eligible to participate. For a project like this, the more community involvement you have, the more likely that the event is fun and successful.

    • 2

      Set a location and time. Advertise it on the street corners. Schools regularly host fall festivals, as do churches. In larger communities, the neighborhood holds the fall festival in one of its parks or grassy areas. Whatever location you choose, secure a backup location in case of bad weather.

    • 3

      Check out any insurance coverage you might need. Also, apply for any legal permits.

    • 4

      Enlist volunteers. This is sometimes the trickiest part of the equation. Recruit dependable people for key positions so you don’t have to scramble to do their job at the last minute.

    • 5

      Arrange for food kiosks. You might have apple pie stands, pumpkin bread stands and chili booths. Or, you might just decide to have a potluck-type meal where everyone brings a covered dish or two. Rent a cotton candy or hot dog machine.

    • 6

      Decorate your fall festival site. It can be as simple as setting out some pumpkins or more elaborate.  A decoration committee is well advised for this chore.

    • 7

      Set up games. Carnival-type games, such as cake walks and fish ponds.  Rent a bounce house…these are great for children. Going along with the fall theme, pumpkin carving competitions are fun as well.

Enjoy!  But alas, make sure there is a clean-up committee designated to tidy up after all of the fun!

How to remove a member of the HOA Board


https://i0.wp.com/nswad.elliotaxiom.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/sign_petition.jpg

Every homeowners association is to maintain the welfare of their community by maintaining an acceptable  standard protocol in all relevant areas of importance to the community itself. This means putting the needs of the community as the first priority in the objectives of each and every member of the  Home Owners Board of Directors. However, in some cases, individual board members can not or will not properly handle the responsibility given to them. When this happens, the council as a whole should consider removing the board member in particular.

But before getting into the best ways to remove a board member, consult first with the statutes of the association. These vary from association to association, and state laws relating to association management should also be checked as there are limitations – for example – Florida laws do not apply in Georgia.

If one or more members of the board shows an irresponsible behavior,   legitimate removal is necessary for the good of the community. However, before starting a potentially very complicated and long process, the board as a whole must put everything in perspective.  Make sure that the removal is based solely on the basis of verified facts and documentation. If a resident plans to file a complaint, he or she – and the HOA went to officials to solve the problem – there is a need to investigate whether the board member is really the culprit.

If it is determined that the board member in effect, be removed, there is a specific process to be followed. Once all the evidence gathered, a formal request to resign must be made to a member of the Board. If the request to opt-out does not work, a more formal meeting between members of the Board is held to discuss the situation. If after this conversation has determined to be in the best interest of the community that this board member is removed, the board has to consult the manual for the board to plan the next steps.

The first step usually involves giving proper notice, either on a scheduled annual meeting – or if more urgent, in a special meeting. A special meeting may be called if the necessary signatures are obtained from members of the community. This ranges from 5 to 50 percent of the members of the community, according to the Covenants and Bylaws of the community themselves. Once enough signatures are acquired for the Board to approve the meeting, a quorum must be established (a minimum number of voters). All homeowners in the community and investors are invited to attend.

At the same meeting, the member of the Board subject to removal must be given an opportunity to defend themselves. Supporters, opponents and Board members should be given enough time to make their case. After the debate is over, the President should appoint independent inspectors to count the votes present. If the board member is removed, the next step is to hold another election to fill the position now vacant.

A board member may be unfair and should be eliminated for the good of the community. However, prevention is always the best tactic. At day’s end, HOA board members should be chosen based on the positive attitude and the good sense to avoid such situations arising in the first place.

High Performing Board Practices


https://i1.wp.com/jaipals.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/leadership.jpg

The public debate on boards often focuses on catastrophic failure. In many cases, the boards actually meet the standards and follow the right policies, but were not committed enough and left to ask the right questions.

Exceptional boards center around four key concepts or practices:

Strategy
This includes being mission-driven, using strategic thinking, and maintaining of sustainable resources.

Responsibility
This includes having  compliance with integrity, being results-oriented, and promoting a spirit of transparency.

Building relationships
This includes developing a constructive partnership between the home owners and the board, ensuring revitalization, and implementing intentional board practices such as thinking about the board’s size, structure, and meetings.
Dynamic
This includes fostering a culture of openness to ensure that all voices are heard, respective practice when making decisions, and demonstrating continuous learning through guidance, education beyond the boardroom and self-evaluation of the board as a whole and the members of the Board.

The true essence of an exceptional board is in the way members of the board and homeowners are interrelated to create something much richer and more powerful than anyone can create one.

When thinking about each other’s participation differently in the meeting, you want to make sure you understand why. It is not just because of better conversations; it is because they have better information and ask better questions which lead to more robust discussions, more authentic debates, and better decision making.

By strengthening our Boards, we will have stronger organizations, and in time much stronger communities. HOA Board leadership is critical to serving the public good and the impact of our State and Country.

Build a Successful Board for Your HOA, POA or Condo Association


https://i2.wp.com/blog.bizmosis.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/team.jpg

WHO SHOULD BE ON THE BOARD?
The board should be composed of a diverse group of individuals who are interested in working toward the organization’s mission and have the particular skills that will help to contribute to a well-run organization. For instance, you may want to seek out people with financial, marketing, or legal backgrounds. You may want to consider bringing on someone with an entrepreneurial
background, or someone who is proficient with emerging technologies. You may
also want to recruit members who have influence in the community, work at similar types of organizations, or are representative of the community you are serving. Having this collective knowledge from the beginning will help you make informed decisions. You will also find that as your organization matures, your board composition needs may be very different from those of your founding board. The role of the board tends to change over time as the organization
develops and matures. Early in an organization’s life, the primary need for the board may be individuals who are prepared to give a great deal of time and energy. Later, you may find that as paid staff are brought on, the board focuses primarily on the governance functions of the organization and is less involved with the smaller details of bringing the organization up to speed.
HOW BIG SHOULD THE BOARD BE?
Boards can vary in size from three to more than 50 members.  Each state has regulations that determine the minimum size of the board, but the optimum number of people who sit on the board should be determined by the needs of the organization. Assess the list of tasks that the board needs to accomplish and plan your board around the jobs that need to be done. There should be enough meaningful tasks for the board to accomplish without leaving board
members feeling overburdened or uninvolved.
HOW OFTEN SHOULD THE BOARD MEET?
As with the size of your board, the number of board meetings each year should be determined by the work that needs to be accomplished. For logistical and practical reasons, larger boards often meet less frequently, leaving much of the work to the board’s committees.
Regular attendance at board meetings is one of the individual responsibilities of board members. Your organization’s bylaws should include an attendance policy that clearly states the number of meetings that can be missed by an individual board member before he or she is asked to leave the board. Develop an annual schedule of meetings determined a year in advance. Circulate clear and thorough information materials, including an agenda, to all members
two to three weeks before each meeting. Maintain complete and accurate minutes of all meetings, and keep meetings brief and well focused. An organization’s bylaws should also state the number of board members required to constitute a quorum. Without a quorum, the board is unable to conduct its official business.
WHAT KIND OF TERM LIMITS SHOULD BOARD MEMBERS SERVE?
There are no hard-and-fast rules for determining board members’ tenure. Many organizations
do, however, limit members to two consecutive terms and require a hiatus of one year before a
board member may be reappointed. Many organizations also stagger terms of service so that
one-half or one-third of board members are elected every one or two years for terms of two to
six years. Such policies encourage institutional renewal because a board can profit from the
experience of veteran board members while welcoming the fresh perspective that new members
offer. Board members on hiatus can remain active in committee service or serve in an
advisory capacity. Term limits are a painless mechanism for rotating inactive or ineffective
members off the board. These policies should be written into the organization’s bylaws.

HOA meeting Seats


http://www2.ku.edu/~sfcenter/Campbell-round-table.jpg

Where you sit in a meeting that determines where you are. Foreign diplomats are particularly careful in choosing the shape of the table and sits next to who, from the slightest misstep can have disastrous results. King Arthur held their meetings at the round table so everyone can participate freely without the king dictating the debate. There are lessons to be learned from this experience that can be applied millennia to deal with HOAs and membership meetings. Each format requires different considerations seats.

Board meetings are designed for regular business transactions for the care and welfare of millions of dollars frequency of active members. As such, they should be held at places and times conducive to business. Meetings held in someone’s home, be a challenge.

At Council meetings start. Members are entitled to attend board meetings as an audience, not participants in the discussion or vote. To facilitate this right, there should be seats for a reasonable number of them. If meetings are held in small rooms with space only for the board, guests are shut out and the impression is that they are welcome. They look for the house has wider to accommodate so much advice and guests.

Avoid the use of living rooms with the exception of guest seating. It is very difficult to juggle the documents or take notes while sitting in a Lazy Boy. Meetings should be held at a table large enough to extend the programs, reports and other documents without having to continuously mix the pile. If using a kitchen table, remove everything except items meeting. Turn off cell phones home and during the meeting because the sound is always interrupted the discussion and pull someone out of the company in question.

If a pit boss, the president should sit down and address the meeting. The head of the table is the historical place of authority and no reason to buck tradition. The secretary records should sit at the opposite end of the table so that all directors can be more easily seen and heard. Customers should not sit at the table meeting of the board as this is an invitation to participate actively in the business.

Avoid the temptation to have the board to guests as a “panel”. This format of seats also invites the participation of the guests and makes it difficult for the board to talk to each other.

Formal meetings of the Board Ideally the board should meet in a place that is designed for meetings. Basics include a large conference table, good lighting, bathrooms, climate control and room for guests. If none exists in the HOA, find meeting rooms in the area of ​​community centers, libraries and churches. They can be closer and cheaper than you think.

There are several advantages to advance “the kitchen” in a formal meeting. The potential for distraction is greatly reduced: no phones, food, television, children, dogs and neighbors. The business meeting takes a real “business” of nature. People are less likely to remain in this environment or get into long discussions. As with the meetings at home, the seats must be appropriate for the board and the guests together at the conference table and invited to one side.

Annual meetings of Owners Association. These meetings should be carefully choreographed. Always keep them in a formal meeting place large enough to accommodate all the owners. Usually take ownership of gallery style with the board on a table in the head unless your group is small enough to fit around a round table of King Arthur. Ideally, the head of the table should be “half moon” or “U” so that all managers can see each other and the audience. Prevent the board feel like panel unless the meeting is intended to be a question and answer session with the directors of the “line of fire.” Make sure you have adequate sound system, if the room requires it.

Seating meeting is very important when it comes to getting things done efficiently. Set your sites for successful meetings and do not forget to check out their swords at the door.

What do Board Members do anyway?


Some people might wonder what Board Members do. Hopefully, this will shed some light on their duties and responsibilities for your community.

Homeowners Association Board

Board Members have a set number of responsibilities when they volunteer for your community.  Remember, they volunteer! So make sure you thank them for what they do.

Board Members are challenged typically on a daily basis with different aspects from personalities and duties and responsibilities within the community.  They have a definite purpose and specific duties to fulfill for your community.

 

The role of the Board is to set policy, standards, budgets and procedures for the association.

Probably the most important duty is the fiduciary obligations to the association.  This can be characterized into two parts; the duty of loyalty and the duty of care.  The duty of loyalty is requires the Board Member to act in good faith always in the interest of the community.  Never acting in their own interest or in the interest of another person. The duty of care requires the Board Member to act in a reasonable, informed manner when participating on the Board and making decisions for the day to day community’s care.

Board Members are able to delegate the duties of the association, but not the responsibility of their positions. It is the Board that is ultimately responsible for the association even if the Board hires a management company.  They can direct actions on behalf of the association, but the Board is completely responsible to the community. 

The governing documents as well as state and federal statues outline the Board responsibility within the community.  Areas of responsibility typically include:

  • ·         Care, maintenance and enhancement of common areas including facilities and physical property.
  • ·         Management of community finances and any reserve funds.
  • ·         Community harmony.
  • ·         Any employment the association has and the human resources of the community.
  • ·         Interpretation, creation, enforcement of the rules and regulations of the community.
  • ·         Community insurance needs and making sure guidelines for such are followed in the declaration.

This is in no way a full compilation of everything your board members do, just an overview of some of their duties.

Source: http://www.hoamanagementdirectory.com/blog.html?action=more&id=79

CONDOMINIUM INSURANCE – WHO COVERS WHAT?


Most condominium association‘s “Declaration of the Condominium” (hereinafter referred to as declaration) follow the wording of Chapter 47C of the North Carolina Condominium Act with regard to the definitions of “common elements” and “units”.  The Declaration specifies what insurance is to be provided by the association and what insurance is to be provided by the unit owners.In the statute, 47C-2-102, Unit boundaries it says: “Except as provided by the declaration:

(1)   If walls, floors or ceilings are designated as boundaries of a unit, then all lath, furring, wallboard, plasterboard, plaster, paneling, tiles, wallpaper, paint, finishes flooring and any other materials constituting any part of the finished surfaces thereof are a part of the unit; and all other portions of such walls, floors, or ceilings are a part of the common elements.

(2)   If any chute, flue, duct, wire, conduit, bearing wall, bearing column, or any other fixture lies partially within and partially outside the designated boundaries of a unit, any portion thereof serving only that unit is a limited common element allocated exclusively to that unit, and any portion thereof serving more than one unit or any portion of the common elements in a part of the common elements.

(3)   Subject to the provisions of paragraph (2), all spaces, interior partitions, and other fixtures and improvements within the boundaries of a unit are a part of the unit.

(4)   Any shutters, awnings, window boxes, doorsteps, stoops, decks, porches, balconies, patios, and all exterior doors and windows or other fixtures designed to serve a single unit but located outside the unit’s boundaries are limited common elements allocated exclusively to that unit (1985 (Reg. Sess., 1986), c.877, s.1.)”

The Declaration of most associations specify that the association shall provide coverage for “common elements” and each unit owner must insure his “unit”.  This would suggest that a unit owner would need to include Coverage A Building under the standard condominium unit owners HO6 to cover the elements of the unit that are actually part of the building (contrasted to “contents” such as clothing, TV‘s, etc.).  The parts of the “unit” which cause concern are building type items such as floor covering, wall covering, built in cabinets and appliances, and interior non-load bearing walls and partitions.

Under 47C-3-113, Insurance (a), “Commencing not later than the time of the first conveyance of a unit to a person other than a declarant, the association shall maintain, to the extent available:

(1)   Property insurance on the common elements insuring against all risks of direct physical loss commonly insured against including fire and extended coverage perils.

47C-3-113 (b) “In the case of a building containing units having horizontal boundaries (multi-story buildings) described in the declaration, the insurance maintained under subdivision (a)(1), to the extent reasonably available, shall include the units, but need not include improvements and betterments installed by unit owners.  This seems to imply that the master policy should include all that comes with the unit at the time of purchase (with standard) allowances.  The unit owner would need to insure the value of any upgrades under the Coverage A Building part of his HO6.

An attorney who has much experience in preparing Declarations has responded to an inquiry as follows: “In response to your memo, please note that, per section 47C-1-104(a) of the Condominium Act “Except as specifically provided in specific section of this chapter, the provisions of this chapter may not be varied by the declaration or the by-laws.”  Section 47C-3-113 (the insurance provision to which your memo refers) states that it may be varied or waived “in the case of a condominium all of whose units are restricted to nonresidential use.”  Accordingly, regardless of what the declaration or by-laws say, unless the insurance is not “reasonably available”, if the condominium contains residential units with horizontal boundaries, the insurance must include the units (but need not include improvements or betterments installed by the unit owners.)

Therefore, we conclude that the Association master policy must cover these described items and the amount of insurance selected should reflect these values.

Another issue is the association policy deductible which can be as much as $10,000.  Perhaps the individual unit owner is uncomfortable with such a large deductible.  A solution would be to purchase an amount of Coverage A Building under the HO6 equal to the cost of his upgrades plus $10,000.  The association policy is primary but it does not cover “upgrades” nor anything under $10,000, so the solution suggested will work.  Also, the HO6 building coverage is not subject to a coinsurance clause.

In order for this solution to work, the association Declaration must follow 47-C-113 (b) of the statute.  The alternative method is to say in the Declaration that the associations will provide coverage on the “common elements” only and each unit owner will have to cover all parts of the unit (including walls, floor coverings, built-ins, etc.)  This method calls for the developer/builder to inform each unit owner as to what the replacement cost of such items is so that the proper amount of Coverage A Building coverage can be obtained by each owner.  Not only is this a cumbersome method, but it appears to be contrary to what is dictated by the statute.

“Grandfathered” Rules


https://i2.wp.com/fwahu.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/grandfatherstatus-150x150.jpg

OK, your HOA’s changing some rules. But the gall of some owners! They want to be exempt from your new rules, or “grandfathered in.” Should you grant their request?

Here, we discuss the pros and cons of creating exceptions for rules, give four examples of when it’s smart and not smart to grandfather residents in, and provide tips to ensure the grandfathered rules don’t last forever and are enforceable.

When to Grandfather? It Depends

“I think it’s a great question,” says David Mercer, a partner at MercerTrigiani in Alexandria, Va., who represents more than 500 associations in Virginia and Washington, D.C. “The answer depends on the specifics of what you’re trying to accomplish. It depends on how serious the problem you’re addressing is and how difficult it’s going to be for residents to change their behavior to comply. Each factual situation you confront brings different issues to the grandfathering clause.”

Robert Galvin, a partner at Davis, Malm & D’Agostine PC in Boston who specializes in representing condos and co-ops, has one absolute. “Never grandfather specific units or people,” he says. “Also, grandfathering isn’t something you do very broadly. Usually, if a rule is a good idea, nobody should be grandfathered. But there are instances where it’s appropriate.”

Here are a few examples:

1. Rental Restrictions

A change of use is a good barometer of when to grandfather, says Kristen L. Rosenbeck, a partner at the Mulcahy Law Firm PC in Phoenix, which represents associations. “I typically want to recommend grandfathering if we’re changing a use,” she says. “Let’s say it’s a rental restriction. That’s a large issue and a change in use. So let’s grandfather owners already renting out their unit and make the rule apply to future owners from this point forward. Some clients want to have the rule take effect when current renters leave. We have case law that says that’s sufficient. But because that change is controversial, I’d recommend clients say the rental would continue until ownership changes.”

2. Color Scheme

Rosenbeck doesn’t think the same reasoning applies to a change in a neighborhood’s color scheme. “We can change the scheme, and that’s not tied to ownership,” she says. “So we could grandfather the current scheme and have it be acceptable until you have to paint your house again.”

3. Pet Rules

“Assume your association is a pet community, so when a condo owner bought, he could have pets,” explains Mercer. “He recognized the condo rule could be changed if, say, 66 and two-thirds of his neighbors voted to change it. Now they’ve voted to change into a no-pet community. The board should want voluntary compliance, but it’s very unrealistic to expect people with pets to move or get rid of their pets to be in compliance. But it’s reasonable to expect that if you grandfather pets in and say, ‘For starters, you need to register your pets. Only those pets will be allowed to stay, and they can’t be replaced when they die.’ Now you’re working toward total, voluntary compliance in several years without the disruption, adversarial approach, and disenfranchisement of people.”

4. Smoking Bans

“There should be no grandfathering when there are safety concerns,” says Rosenbeck. Example? “If you take a health issue like smoking, and you want to ban smoking in the entire property, that gets a little more traction if you say, ‘Except in your unit, we’re banning smoking in all areas,'” adds Mercer. “Still, you might want to consider an area in the common elements that would be restricted as a smoking area rather than going cold turkey on all areas.”

“Every time I’ve been involved in a change that alters the fiber of a community, the association has provided grandfathering,” says Mercer. “It’s difficult enough to get an amendment that you risk it not being passed without grandfathering. The analogy I make is that of a local government authority that wants to change zoning and prohibit a light industrial use in a particular zone. The government can’t just say to someone, ‘And by the way you can’t run your business anymore. But it can say, ‘You can’t sell or change your business use, and once you end the business, it’s done.'”

Source:  http://www.communityassociationmanagement.com/rules/violations-and-enforcement/2461-qgrandfatheredq-rules.html

Keeping Children Safe at Play


http://genomaru.files.wordpress.com/2010/08/00005134.jpg

What would be more delightful or heartwarming than the sights and sounds of laughing and playing in your community?

 

Every effort should be made to ensure that the joys of childhood continue in associations, especially with the importance of putting community back into community associations.  From a child‘s perspective, “kid friendly” means fewer rules and restrictions. From the adult’s perspective, it means only implementing and enforcing those rules that are absolutely necessary to protect themselves, the children and association property.

 

The existence and enforcement of reasonable rules can protect an association from liability, but liabilities remain, especially when the association doesn’t or can’t enforce those rules all the time. Just as an owner might sue an association based on the board’s failure to enforce a nuisance rule, an owner also could sue if the association failed to enforce a rule that prohibits children from climbing common element trees or playing in common element parking areas. Theoretically, the association passed the rule because of the inherent danger associated with the activity, thus the association had a duty to enforce its rule to prevent the danger. Would such a theory hold up in court? Much stranger things have happened.

 

Summer Fun at the Homeowners Associaition Pool

Associations should pass only rules that are essential to the health, safety and welfare of their residents–and ones that they can and will enforce. But what rules are essential? Each association must answer that question based on the circumstances and needs of the community. However, let’s take a look at the tree-climbing and parking-lot rules mentioned earlier.

 

A rule against children climbing trees on common elements could recognize both that children occasionally fall out of the trees they climb and that the trees can be damaged. Often the tree is too small for the size of the climber or the climber has tried smaller and weaker branches. In both cases, the damage to the tree may be accompanied by injury to the child. These certainly are legitimate interests, but do they warrant a rule? The association should ask first whether it needs the rule as a warning. In my opinion, most courts will recognize that children are naturally interested in climbing trees and may be injured by doing so. The courts also will recognize that it would be difficult, at best, to keep children out of a good climbing tree. Moreover, every child and parent already knows that if a climber falls from a tree, he or she likely will be injured. Thus, the rule is probably not necessary as a warning

 

The association should explore next whether it needs the rule as a deterrent-preventing climbing through fear of consequence. If the fear of falling is not a natural deterrent, I suspect that the fear of a fine or sanction (which mom or dad would have to pay) is not likely to do the trick–at least from the child’s perspective. Nor will it have a deterrent effect on parents. Those parents who would keep their children out of trees even if no rule existed don’t need the rule. Similarly, those who feel it is OK for their child to climb trees probably would find the rule silly and would not be deterred.

 

Then, does the association need the rule to protect association or owner property, or limit association liability? As for the property issue, trees lose limbs and branches naturally, so the loss of a few to climbers probably isn’t a big deal. If damage occurs to a tree on a lot, the owner probably has the right to make a claim against the master policy as well as his or her homeowners insurance policy.

The liability issue is more problematic. The mere existence of the rule may invite liability because the association will not be able to monitor all trees all the time. In actuality, most associations will not watch their trees unless a board member or manager just happens along and sees a climber.

 

Although it might seem ludicrous, a litigant certainly could claim that he or she relied upon the association’s rule to keep his or her child out of trees, and thus out of harm’s way.

 

The real problem, of course, is that this rule is not kid friendly. And, if the association passes such a rule without one or more of the elements mentioned earlier being of primary concern to the welfare of the association, the rule is not likely to have a positive effect.

 

Similarly, a rule prohibiting children from playing in common element parking lots appears to be a no brainer because it benefits all. However, looks are deceiving. In this case, both children and parents should know that playing in the parking lot is inherently dangerous. Parents also know that smaller children must be watched because a passing motorist may not be able to avoid a child darting between parked cars. Motorists also know to drive cautiously in a residential parking lot. Accordingly, a rule against playing in the parking lots is superfluous for warning purposes.

This rule won’t deter children from playing in the parking lots. Presumably, smaller children will be kept from these areas by parents or older siblings. Older children probably will play there whether the rule is known to them or not. Kids have been playing ball and skating in streets and parking lots as long as there have been streets and parking lots.

 

Finally, the existence of this rule is likely to have little positive effect on the association’s liability in the event of a tragedy. Let’s say that a child is injured by a vehicle in the parking lot. The association’s liability for such an incident, if any, will probably concern the lighting level in the parking lot or perhaps poorly placed plantings that impeded the driver’s view. If these circumstances contribute to the likelihood of the injury, having a rule against playing in the parking lots will not protect the association from liability. And, as in the previous example, a grieving parent could claim that, had the association enforced its rule, the child would not have been injured or killed.

 

So what appear at first impression to be two reasonable rules really have no redeeming value; they are not kid friendly. They are difficult or impossible to enforce. If anything, they might add to an association’s potential for liability. In short, they’re unnecessary.

 

The only kid-centric rules associations must have are those related to the swimming pool. Some associations also have rules related to the minimum age for use of tennis courts. Associations with a workout facility may need to have rules about equipment use as well. Otherwise, the best rules for children are the ones imposed by their parents.  After all, the parents will be held responsible for damage done by children that is not covered by insurance.

 

Source: http://www.communityassociationmanagement.com/rules/violations-and-enforcement/2473-children-at-play.html

Keeping the Peace Among the Neighborhood and Condo Associations


Body Language

Clubhouse Meeting

As the Treasurer of the board, you’re at a homeowners meeting explaining why fees need to be increased.  “I’m confident that this is the right thing to do and I’m open to your comments,” you say.  A homeowner in the audience is staring at you with arms crossed, lips pursed and fists closed.  Should you be concerned?

People’s gestures often give away their true feelings.  Holding eye contact can signal an impending challenge; tight lips may spell defiance; the position of the arms and fists often indicates a closed an hostile attitude.

Most of us miss body language cues- and miss the chance to communicate effectively.  You may not even realize what your non-verbal messages tell others, but they’re important.

Body language accounts for more than half of your message, while words and tone make up the rest, according to experts.  If your words say, “I’m confident,” but your body says otherwise, people are more likely to believe what your body is communicating.

Here’s how you can use body language to enhance your face-to-face communications.

Make sure your verbal and non-verbal messages are in sync.  As the board treasurer in the example; you need to convey confidence by walking tall, sitting upright, and standing straight when speaking.  You’ll gain credibility if you make eye contact with people you’re talking to- but don’t hold their gaze too long or you’ll create discomfort.  Keep your palms visible and open to show you’re receptive.

Harmony

Keep your facial expression neutral.  It will show that you’re unbiased.  If you cultivate a neutral attitude-by admitting that you have an opinion and consciously setting it aside – then a neutral expression will follow.  Avoid silent feedback, like nodding your head in agreement or disagreement, when you’re listening to a residents comments or a contractor’s pitch.  The last thing you want to do is give the impression that you’ll take a position and then later vote to do the opposite.

Be aware of your own body language.  Learn how your feelings affect your gestures.  What do you do when you’re anxious, angry or elated?

Adjust your body language in response to the signals others give you. For example, when you’re standing chatting with a resident, start by standing at a distance that works for you.  If the other person moves back, don’t step forward again.  This will make your neighbor feel comfortable because you’re not invading their personal territory.

Be Natural.  When you believe what you say and feel, your body language will support your message and you’ll appear genuine.  If you try to adopt mannerisms that don’t support your true feelings, you’ll seem phony.

Dress for success.  As a rule of thumb, it’s a good idea to dress slightly more professionally than the person you are meeting.  It shows respect because you’ve taken the time to present well.

But back to the meeting – how should you respond to your neighbor who seems disgruntled, not just cold?

Tell yourself that you will not lose your cool, and your body language will show that you remain confident and in control.  Be conscious of what you do when you’re threatened or angry and curb those behaviors.  Don’t look menacing in return by mirroring the offending body cues.  If all else fails, take a break.  Then you can all come back refreshed and ready to start communicating again.

Read from the source at http://www.communityassociationmanagement.com/dispute-resolution/preventing-disputes/193-body-talk-.html