Tag Archives: Riverside Property Management

A list of the Do’s and Dont’s in HOA Management:


Community Associations

  • Customer service. Answer your calls and emails within 24 hours of receipt. Even if you don’t have an answer, let your client/homeowner know that you are working on it.
  • Know your community. Set your goals to be proactive, not reactive.
  • Be respectful. Treat that nasty, arrogant man or woman with respect; they may be your next Board President.
  • Maintain your cool. If a homeowner is calling you names and yelling, don’t take it personally. Nine times out of ten, they are just having a bad day and you have been chosen to take it out on. Surprisingly, after they have vented, they will often call you back to apologize.
  • Support staff. Acknowledge and appreciate those that are there to support you. It only takes a second to add a line to your email after they have gathered information for you to say, Hey, I appreciate all you do for me.
  • Never, ever lie. If you have forgotten or not completed a task given you by the Board, tell them I am sorry. I overlooked that directive but I will follow up immediately. The Board will understand that sometimes unforeseen things happen. If you are straight forward and provided you don’t make a habit of overlooking your assignments, they will understand.
  • Rumblings of dissatisfaction. Working for a management company means client retention. If you feel, hear or suspect any dissatisfaction, then you need to address this issue with your supervisors. What begins as a tempest in a teakettle ultimately could lead to a hurricane. Less clients for your company can mean cuts backs in the work force.
  • Ask questions. No one has all the answers all of the time. Ignorance is not bliss if you have read the documents wrong or given your Board misinformation. Better to say, I don’t have an answer at this time, but I will research the issue and report back promptly.
  • Stay focused. On the days that every call you get is from a cranky homeowner, every email seems full of hate, you feel sure that your supervisor appears to be looking at you with thoughts of terminating your employment, and you are ready to just give up. . . you might be surprised that the next call is from a homeowner or Board member telling you how much they appreciate you, the next email is one giving you a glowing reference on a job well done, or you are paged to come to the reception desk and find a floral delivery from a grateful Board/Homeowner, and you see your supervisor in the hallway and well, three out of four ain’t bad.

Riverside Property Management is a Homeowners association management company management company proudly serving Roswell, Alpharetta, Buckhead, Marietta and all of North Georgia. Riverside is also an expert Georgia condo association management company and high rise Atlanta association management company. To find out more about Riverside Property Management and why it is one of Georgia’s fastest growing property management companies, go to www.riversidepropertymgt.com. You’ll be glad you did.  (678) 866-1436

How to Overcome a Lazy Board of Directors in Your HOA


A stagnant board of directors slows down the business initiatives of an Association and may cause the Community to lag behind comparable neighborhoods. Overcoming stagnation at an HOA requires establishing more open lines of communication with board members and seeking to identify key problems. Solving those same problems may also require the removal of board members in favor of more progressive executive minds.

Present Accurate Information

An obstinate board of directors may be unreceptive to vague concepts and generalized initiatives in the absence of hard facts and current comparisons. Arming yourself with thorough research into your proposal and/or requests compels board members to connect with your idea in a way that’s relevant to the geographic area. For example, presenting a proposal for tennis court lighting could use marketing research to indicate a residents (and guests-ALTA) need for features your new lighting will serve.

Listen to the Board

Candid conversation between you as a homeowner or investor and a Homeowners’ Association board of directors may reveal issues within the board that are causing the stagnation among its members. Opening up these issues and finding workable solutions to problems can make board members more receptive to new ideas because you’re seeking to address existing concerns even while moving the Community ahead. This builds a climate of trust between you and board members and lays the groundwork for more open communication in the future.

Gain Voting Rights

When reason and a well-crafted proposal fail, reaching a stagnant board of directors may involve accumulating enough power to remove certain members in favor of new voices. Homeowners have the right to elect and remove board members because they have equal ownership of the common areas. If you have the neighborhood backing, accumulating enough interest to call a vote for the removal of board members is a matter of lobbying. The Governing Documents (Covenants and By-Laws) or articles of incorporation contain the rules detailing the exact amount of votes required to gain this power. Ousting key dissenting board members may be sufficient to convince the remaining board members to listen more closely to new initiatives.

Riverside Property Management, Inc. is a leading provider of Homeowner Association management services in the North Atlanta area.  Including, but not limited to:  all accounting procedures, vendor/contract management, covenant enforcement and management consulting services.  Call today for a free quote on management of your HOA, POA or Condo Association at 678-866-1436 or go to www.riversidepropertymgt.com.

 

A list of Do’s and Dont’s for HOA Management:


Community Associations

  • Customer service. Answer your calls and emails within 24 hours of receipt. Even if you don’t have an answer, let your client/homeowner know that you are working on it.
  • Know your community. Set your goals to be proactive, not reactive.
  • Be respectful. Treat that nasty, arrogant man or woman with respect; they may be your next Board President.
  • Maintain your cool. If a homeowner is calling you names and yelling, don’t take it personally. Nine times out of ten, they are just having a bad day and you have been chosen to take it out on. Surprisingly, after they have vented, they will often call you back to apologize.
  • Support staff. Acknowledge and appreciate those that are there to support you. It only takes a second to add a line to your email after they have gathered information for you to say, Hey, I appreciate all you do for me.
  • Never, ever lie. If you have forgotten or not completed a task given you by the Board, tell them I am sorry. I overlooked that directive but I will follow up immediately. The Board will understand that sometimes unforeseen things happen. If you are straight forward and provided you don’t make a habit of overlooking your assignments, they will understand.
  • Rumblings of dissatisfaction. Working for a management company means client retention. If you feel, hear or suspect any dissatisfaction, then you need to address this issue with your supervisors. What begins as a tempest in a teakettle ultimately could lead to a hurricane. Less clients for your company can mean cuts backs in the work force.
  • Ask questions. No one has all the answers all of the time. Ignorance is not bliss if you have read the documents wrong or given your Board misinformation. Better to say, I don’t have an answer at this time, but I will research the issue and report back promptly.
  • Stay focused. On the days that every call you get is from a cranky homeowner, every email seems full of hate, you feel sure that your supervisor appears to be looking at you with thoughts of terminating your employment, and you are ready to just give up. . . you might be surprised that the next call is from a homeowner or Board member telling you how much they appreciate you, the next email is one giving you a glowing reference on a job well done, or you are paged to come to the reception desk and find a floral delivery from a grateful Board/Homeowner, and you see your supervisor in the hallway and well, three out of four ain’t bad.

Riverside Property Management is a Homeowners association management company management company proudly serving Roswell, Alpharetta, Buckhead, Marietta and all of North Georgia. Riverside is also an expert Georgia condo association management company and high rise Atlanta association management company. To find out more about Riverside Property Management and why it is one of Georgia’s fastest growing property management companies, go to www.riversidepropertymgt.com. You’ll be glad you did.  (678) 866-1436

 

How to Overcome a Stagnant Board of Directors in Your Homeowners Association


A stagnant board of directors slows down the business initiatives of an Association and may cause the Community to lag behind comparable neighborhoods. Overcoming stagnation at an HOA requires establishing more open lines of communication with board members and seeking to identify key problems. Solving those same problems may also require the removal of board members in favor of more progressive executive minds.

Present Accurate Information

An obstinate board of directors may be unreceptive to vague concepts and generalized initiatives in the absence of hard facts and current comparisons. Arming yourself with thorough research into your proposal and/or requests compels board members to connect with your idea in a way that’s relevant to the geographic area. For example, presenting a proposal for tennis court lighting could use marketing research to indicate a residents (and guests-ALTA) need for features your new lighting will serve.

Listen to the Board

Candid conversation between you as a homeowner or investor and a Homeowners’ Association board of directors may reveal issues within the board that are causing the stagnation among its members. Opening up these issues and finding workable solutions to problems can make board members more receptive to new ideas because you’re seeking to address existing concerns even while moving the Community ahead. This builds a climate of trust between you and board members and lays the groundwork for more open communication in the future.

Gain Voting Rights

When reason and a well-crafted proposal fail, reaching a stagnant board of directors may involve accumulating enough power to remove certain members in favor of new voices. Homeowners have the right to elect and remove board members because they have equal ownership of the common areas. If you have the neighborhood backing, accumulating enough interest to call a vote for the removal of board members is a matter of lobbying. The Governing Documents (Covenants and By-Laws) or articles of incorporation contain the rules detailing the exact amount of votes required to gain this power. Ousting key dissenting board members may be sufficient to convince the remaining board members to listen more closely to new initiatives.

Riverside Property Management, Inc. is a leading provider of Homeowner Association management services in the North Atlanta area.  Including, but not limited to:  all accounting procedures, vendor/contract management, covenant enforcement and management consulting services.  Call today for a free quote on management of your HOA, POA or Condo Association at 678-866-1436 or go to www.riversidepropertymgt.com.

 

A list of Do’s and Dont’s for HOA Management:


 

Community Associations

  • Customer service. Answer your calls and emails within 24 hours of receipt. Even if you don’t have an answer, let your client/homeowner know that you are working on it.
  • Know your community. Set your goals to be proactive, not reactive.
  • Be respectful. Treat that nasty, arrogant man or woman with respect; they may be your next Board President.
  • Maintain your cool. If a homeowner is calling you names and yelling, don’t take it personally. Nine times out of ten, they are just having a bad day and you have been chosen to take it out on. Surprisingly, after they have vented, they will often call you back to apologize.
  • Support staff. Acknowledge and appreciate those that are there to support you. It only takes a second to add a line to your email after they have gathered information for you to say, Hey, I appreciate all you do for me.
  • Never, ever lie. If you have forgotten or not completed a task given you by the Board, tell them I am sorry. I overlooked that directive but I will follow up immediately. The Board will understand that sometimes unforeseen things happen. If you are straight forward and provided you don’t make a habit of overlooking your assignments, they will understand.
  • Rumblings of dissatisfaction. Working for a management company means client retention. If you feel, hear or suspect any dissatisfaction, then you need to address this issue with your supervisors. What begins as a tempest in a teakettle ultimately could lead to a hurricane. Less clients for your company can mean cuts backs in the work force.
  • Ask questions. No one has all the answers all of the time. Ignorance is not bliss if you have read the documents wrong or given your Board misinformation. Better to say, I don’t have an answer at this time, but I will research the issue and report back promptly.
  • Stay focused. On the days that every call you get is from a cranky homeowner, every email seems full of hate, you feel sure that your supervisor appears to be looking at you with thoughts of terminating your employment, and you are ready to just give up. . . you might be surprised that the next call is from a homeowner or Board member telling you how much they appreciate you, the next email is one giving you a glowing reference on a job well done, or you are paged to come to the reception desk and find a floral delivery from a grateful Board/Homeowner, and you see your supervisor in the hallway and well, three out of four ain’t bad.

Riverside Property Management in Kennesaw works with homeowner and condo associations providing a variety of management, code enforcement, consulting and educational services, reserve studies, budgeting assistance and maintenance planning expertise.

 

How to Overcome a Stagnant Board of Directors in Your Homeowners Association


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A stagnant board of directors slows down the business initiatives of an Association and may cause the Community to lag behind comparable neighborhoods. Overcoming stagnation at an HOA requires establishing more open lines of communication with board members and seeking to identify key problems. Solving those same problems may also require the removal of board members in favor of more progressive executive minds.

Present Accurate Information

An obstinate board of directors may be unreceptive to vague concepts and generalized initiatives in the absence of hard facts and current comparisons. Arming yourself with thorough research into your proposal and/or requests compels board members to connect with your idea in a way that’s relevant to the geographic area. For example, presenting a proposal for tennis court lighting could use marketing research to indicate a residents (and guests-ALTA) need for features your new lighting will serve.

Listen to the Board

Candid conversation between you as a homeowner or investor and a Homeowners’ Association board of directors may reveal issues within the board that are causing the stagnation among its members. Opening up these issues and finding workable solutions to problems can make board members more receptive to new ideas because you’re seeking to address existing concerns even while moving the Community ahead. This builds a climate of trust between you and board members and lays the groundwork for more open communication in the future.

Gain Voting Rights

When reason and a well-crafted proposal fail, reaching a stagnant board of directors may involve accumulating enough power to remove certain members in favor of new voices. Homeowners have the right to elect and remove board members because they have equal ownership of the common areas. If you have the neighborhood backing, accumulating enough interest to call a vote for the removal of board members is a matter of lobbying. The Governing Documents (Covenants and By-Laws) or articles of incorporation contain the rules detailing the exact amount of votes required to gain this power. Ousting key dissenting board members may be sufficient to convince the remaining board members to listen more closely to new initiatives.

Riverside Property Management, Inc. is a leading provider of Homeowner Association management services in the North Atlanta area.  Including, but not limited to:  all accounting procedures, vendor/contract management, covenant enforcement and management consulting services.  Call today for a free quote on management of your HOA, POA or Condo Association at 678-866-1436 or go to www.riversidepropertymgt.com.

A list of Do’s and Dont’s for Community Management:


Community Associations

  • Customer service. Answer your calls and emails within 24 hours of receipt. Even if you don’t have an answer, let your client/homeowner know that you are working on it.
  • Know your community. Set your goals to be proactive, not reactive.
  • Be respectful. Treat that nasty, arrogant man or woman with respect; they may be your next Board President.
  • Maintain your cool. If a homeowner is calling you names and yelling, don’t take it personally. Nine times out of ten, they are just having a bad day and you have been chosen to take it out on. Surprisingly, after they have vented, they will often call you back to apologize.
  • Support staff. Acknowledge and appreciate those that are there to support you. It only takes a second to add a line to your email after they have gathered information for you to say, Hey, I appreciate all you do for me.
  • Never, ever lie. If you have forgotten or not completed a task given you by the Board, tell them I am sorry. I overlooked that directive but I will follow up immediately. The Board will understand that sometimes unforeseen things happen. If you are straight forward and provided you don’t make a habit of overlooking your assignments, they will understand.
  • Rumblings of dissatisfaction. Working for a management company means client retention. If you feel, hear or suspect any dissatisfaction, then you need to address this issue with your supervisors. What begins as a tempest in a teakettle ultimately could lead to a hurricane. Less clients for your company can mean cuts backs in the work force.
  • Ask questions. No one has all the answers all of the time. Ignorance is not bliss if you have read the documents wrong or given your Board misinformation. Better to say, I don’t have an answer at this time, but I will research the issue and report back promptly.
  • Stay focused. On the days that every call you get is from a cranky homeowner, every email seems full of hate, you feel sure that your supervisor appears to be looking at you with thoughts of terminating your employment, and you are ready to just give up. . . you might be surprised that the next call is from a homeowner or Board member telling you how much they appreciate you, the next email is one giving you a glowing reference on a job well done, or you are paged to come to the reception desk and find a floral delivery from a grateful Board/Homeowner, and you see your supervisor in the hallway and well, three out of four ain’t bad.

Riverside Property Management in Kennesaw works with homeowner and condo associations providing a variety of management, code enforcement, consulting and educational services, reserve studies, budgeting assistance and maintenance planning expertise.

Audit the Associations Books?


Audits are Expensive and Should Be Done Selectively.

An audit is an extensive and methodical examination of all of the books, records and accounts that support the financial statements.  In most circumstances, they are costly and time consuming.  However, it is often prudent to audit the HOA books and records whenever a developer turns over a community to the homeowners to verify that the developer has fulfilled its obligations to the association, and won’t leave unit owners holding the bag for any unpaid fees.  Or an audit may be need if misappropriation of funds by an association or management company is suspected or a community is transtioning from self-management to a management company and experiencing extreme financial hardship.    In those case, a forensic audit must be performed to determine exactly where the money has been going.

A Review is a Less Expensive Alternative to an Audit.

A review is a report of limited assurance stating that the accountant is not aware of any material modifications that need to be made to the financial statements in order for them to conform with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). The accountant must perform sufficient inquiry and procedures to give a reasonable basis for that conclusion.  A review is a more affordable alternative for most associations and should be sufficient in most cases.

When governing documents talk about “audit,” it generally refers to some level of independent review of the books by a CPA.   Depending on the size and complexity of your HOA, an audit may be overkill and may not be warranted.   Rather than perform an annual audit, the Board may elect to perform an annual review.

Whether your HOA decides to do a review, a compilation, or a full blown audit,  we think it is a good idea to do on an annual basis.   Some HOA governing documents require it, others are silent on this point.

There are a variety of qualified CPA‘s in the Atlanta area that can do this work for your Atlanta HOA. Why is this a good idea? The easiest answer is a simple one: it’s smart, prudent policy. Even if you are confident in your Atlanta HOA management company, it is a good idea to do this as it shows the membership that you are being thorough in your desire to ensure the HOA’s funds are tended to in an appropriate manner. Regardless of whether you do an audit, make sure you review the financial reports you get from your property management company each month.

We are happy to provide financial report training to any of our clients. We’ll explain what the GAAP rules are and why we adhere to them in your financial reporting. We’ll also explain the rules of double entry and much more. If you are interested in getting more information on our financial report training webinars please contact us by going to our website at http://www.riversidepropertymgt.com.

Thank You For A Great Year!


A full cornucopia

Happy Thanksgiving

From our Family to Yours

Best ThanksgivingThanksgiving is here, so our minds have turned
To what time has taught us, to what we’ve learned:
We often focus all our thought
On shiny things we’ve shopped and bought;
We take our pleasure in material things
Forgetting the pleasure that friendship brings.
If a lot of our stuff just vanished today,
We’d see the foundation of each happy day
Is special relationships, constant and true,
And that’s when our thoughts go directly to you.
We wish you a Thanksgiving you’ll never forget,
Full of love and joy—your best one yet!

Riverside Property Management wants you to know that you are appreciated on Thanksgiving and every other day of the year!

A small leaf

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