Tag Archives: Property

Duties of the Architectural Control Committee or ACC


Green Initiatives for HOA's

Are you getting ready to make an addition to your house or build a new shed or fence in your back yard? Before you break out the miter saw, make sure to get your plans approved by our association’s architectural committee.

While it may seem arbitrary from an individual homeowner’s standpoint, the architectural committee looks out for the entire community. Aside from stopping residents from painting pink polka dots on their houses, the committee’s job is to make sure that the size and style of the project, the type of building materials being used and the overall look of the new structure adhere to the association’s design requirements. Not only does this keep the community looking cohesive, it also helps to keep property values up by preventing individual structures from standing out. Of course, it’s also important to note that unapproved structures might legally have to be removed at the owner’s expense, so save yourself money and headaches by getting approval before building.

So when you’re ready to start your new project, or if the design of your project changes midway through building it, send your plans to the architectural committee first so that we can make sure they’re in compliance with the association’s design standards. If we do find any issues, we’ll let you know what they are and try to help you come up with other options. We appreciate all the hard work residents have done to make their homes and this community beautiful—help us keep this association looking great by keeping us in the loop of all your building projects.

Riverside Property Management is a Homeowners association management company management company proudly serving Roswell, Alpharetta, Buckhead, Marietta and all of North Georgia. Riverside is also an expert Georgia condo association management company and high rise Atlanta association management company. To find out more about Riverside Property Management and why it is one of Georgia’s fastest growing property management companies, go to www.riversidepropertymgt.com. You’ll be glad you did.  (678) 866-1436

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Duties of the Architectural Control Committee or ACC


Green Initiatives for HOA's

Are you getting ready to make an addition to your house or build a new shed or fence in your back yard? Before you break out the miter saw, make sure to get your plans approved by our association’s architectural committee.

While it may seem arbitrary from an individual homeowner’s standpoint, the architectural committee looks out for the entire community. Aside from stopping residents from painting pink polka dots on their houses, the committee’s job is to make sure that the size and style of the project, the type of building materials being used and the overall look of the new structure adhere to the association’s design requirements. Not only does this keep the community looking cohesive, it also helps to keep property values up by preventing individual structures from standing out. Of course, it’s also important to note that unapproved structures might legally have to be removed at the owner’s expense, so save yourself money and headaches by getting approval before building.

So when you’re ready to start your new project, or if the design of your project changes midway through building it, send your plans to the architectural committee first so that we can make sure they’re in compliance with the association’s design standards. If we do find any issues, we’ll let you know what they are and try to help you come up with other options. We appreciate all the hard work residents have done to make their homes and this community beautiful—help us keep this association looking great by keeping us in the loop of all your building projects.

Riverside Property Management is a Homeowners association management company management company proudly serving Roswell, Alpharetta, Buckhead, Marietta and all of North Georgia. Riverside is also an expert Georgia condo association management company and high rise Atlanta association management company. To find out more about Riverside Property Management and why it is one of Georgia’s fastest growing property management companies, go to www.riversidepropertymgt.com. You’ll be glad you did.  (678) 866-1436

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Duties of the Architectural Committee


Going to Dogs

Are you getting ready to make an addition to your house or build a new shed or fence in your back yard? Before you break out the miter saw, make sure to get your plans approved by our association’s architectural committee.

While it may seem arbitrary from an individual homeowner’s standpoint, the architectural committee looks out for the entire community. Aside from stopping residents from painting pink polka dots on their houses, the committee’s job is to make sure that the size and style of the project, the type of building materials being used and the overall look of the new structure adhere to the association’s design requirements. Not only does this keep the community looking cohesive, it also helps to keep property values up by preventing individual structures from standing out. Of course, it’s also important to note that unapproved structures might legally have to be removed at the owner’s expense, so save yourself money and headaches by getting approval before building.

So when you’re ready to start your new project, or if the design of your project changes midway through building it, send your plans to the architectural committee first so that we can make sure they’re in compliance with the association’s design standards. If we do find any issues, we’ll let you know what they are and try to help you come up with other options. We appreciate all the hard work residents have done to make their homes and this community beautiful—help us keep this association looking great by keeping us in the loop of all your building projects.

Riverside Property Management is a Homeowners association management company management company proudly serving Roswell, Alpharetta, Buckhead, Marietta and all of North Georgia. Riverside is also an expert Georgia condo association management company and high rise Atlanta association management company. To find out more about Riverside Property Management and why it is one of Georgia’s fastest growing property management companies, go to www.riversidepropertymgt.com. You’ll be glad you did.  (678) 866-1436

[contact-form][contact-field label='Name' type='name' required='1'/][contact-field label='Email' type='email' required='1'/][contact-field label='Website' type='url'/][contact-field label='Comment' type='textarea' required='1'/][/contact-form]

What the Architectural Committee Does for You


Going to Dogs

Are you getting ready to make an addition to your house or build a new shed or fence in your back yard? Before you break out the miter saw, make sure to get your plans approved by our association’s architectural committee.

 

While it may seem arbitrary from an individual homeowner’s standpoint, the architectural committee looks out for the entire community. Aside from stopping residents from painting pink polka dots on their houses, the committee’s job is to make sure that the size and style of the project, the type of building materials being used and the overall look of the new structure adhere to the association’s design requirements. Not only does this keep the community looking cohesive, it also helps to keep property values up by preventing individual structures from standing out. Of course, it’s also important to note that unapproved structures might legally have to be removed at the owner’s expense, so save yourself money and headaches by getting approval before building.

 

So when you’re ready to start your new project, or if the design of your project changes midway through building it, send your plans to the architectural committee first so that we can make sure they’re in compliance with the association’s design standards. If we do find any issues, we’ll let you know what they are and try to help you come up with other options. We appreciate all the hard work residents have done to make their homes and this community beautiful—help us keep this association looking great by keeping us in the loop of all your building projects.

Riverside Property Management is a Homeowners association management company management company proudly serving Roswell, Alpharetta, Buckhead, Marietta and all of North Georgia. Riverside is also an expert Georgia condo association management company and high rise Atlanta association management company. To find out more about Riverside Property Management and why it is one of Georgia’s fastest growing property management companies, go to www.riversidepropertymgt.com. You’ll be glad you did.  (678) 866-1436

The Rise of the Homeowner Association


Posted on Nov 6, 2011 in Blog by hoa-admin…

With 62 million Americans governed by HOA’s and $35 billion dollars in operating revenues and growing, HOATown.com thought is was time to bring clarity to the homeowner association with a one-of-a-kind infographic: The Rise of the Homeowner Association.

CAUGHT IN THE ACT: ENFORCING PROTECTIVE COVENANTS WHILE THE VIOLATION OCCURS


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One of the greatest challenges for a community association board of directors is enforcing the community’s protective covenants.  Protective covenants are a wonderful tool for communities that wish to maintain an established quality and character.  To help maintain this quality and character, an association’s declaration of protective covenants typically contains a provision requiring property owners to seek and obtain approval from the association’s board of directors or architectural control committee before making any exterior changes to the property. In the event that a property owner makes exterior changes to the property without first seeking and obtaining approval, the protective covenants usually include a number of enforcement tools such as fining, self help and the right to seek a court injunction.
Unfortunately, at some point most associations are faced with a situation where fining and/or self-help just can’t do the trick because the violation is still in progress when discovered.   For example, imagine coming home from a long and draining business trip. The only thing on your mind is getting home and relaxing on the front porch and enjoying the familiar sights of your community.   As you pull in your driveway you almost collide with the light post when you notice the largest, most horrific structure you have ever seen in your life.  As you get out of the car you realize that this monstrosity is a partially-constructed, three-car sheet metal garage located at the edge of the property line and directly facing your porch. You soon learn that the owner failed to submit a property modification request and did not obtain approval before beginning the construction of this garage.   You immediately call the president of the board who assures you that a violation letter will be sent demanding that these owners immediately cease and desist all construction and informing them of the violation and imposing a $25 per day fine –of course, the owners will, per the declaration, have 10 days to appeal before the fine actually becomes effective.
Clearly fines and letters will not be not sufficient in this case.  This type of violation must be stopped immediately, before the owner completes the construction.  When the board discovers such a violation “in the act” and wants the violation stopped immediately, it is not only advisable but often legally necessary for the association to immediately file a lawsuit seek a temporary Court order requiring the construction to cease. Failure to act immediately to address the violation may give rise to the equitable defense known as Laches.
“Laches” occurs when the association is aware of a violation but “unreasonably” delays bringing suit to address the violation which results in some sort of prejudice to the violating owner.  In the hypothetical above, if the association merely sent the letter, allowed the unauthorized construction to be completed, and only then brought suit to have the garage removed the Association could very well be found to have committed laches.    The Owner would most likely argue that the association’s failure to act prior to the completion of the garage resulted in prejudice in that he continued to expend large amounts of resources after the association learned of the violation.  Further, the owners would argue that the cost of removing the garage has also increased significantly from the point when the association discovered the violation.   As a result, a Georgia court could very well rule against the association and deny its request to have the garage removed.  Under the doctrine of laches, the Court can allow the garage to stay even if it finds that the construction was clearly performed in violation of the protective covenants.
The doctrine of laches is considered an “equitable doctrine” because it is based upon the principle of fairness as opposed to a strict application of the rules of law. In our hypothetical, the law is clear that construction without prior board approval is a violation of the covenants.  However, the principals of equity demand that, where there is a significant expenditure of funds and/or improvement of realty, the association must act swiftly to enforce its rights. When the Association fails to act swiftly, the “good faith” violator can be said to have justifiably relied upon the association’s inaction.   In such a case, the Court will likely agree with the violator who argues that the association’s failure to act resulted in the violating owners continued expenditure of significant funds and effort to complete the construction of the structure. The Court will likely agree with the violator who argues that the improvements are not easily undone and that the Association, having had knowledge of the violation prior to the completion of the construction, failed to act and effectively approved the construction.  Further, the court will likely agree that the violator’s reliance upon the association’s inaction was justifiable. In short the principals of equity intervene and will prevent an association from purposely waiting until a violator has completed the work before enforcing its rights under the Declaration, thereby inflicting the greatest amount of cost and consequence on the violator.
The principles of equity abhors inaction by the party that seeks to enforce its rights. To avoid this scenario, upon discovery of such a violation, the association must act quickly and immediately seek judicial relief. Over the years the Courts have gone back and forth on what types of violations and how much delay can give rise to a laches defense.
The landmark legal opinion which dictates the application of the doctrine of laches to community association cases is set forth by the Georgia Superior Court in Bacon v. Edwards, 234 Ga 100, 214 S.E.2d 539. In Bacon, the Georgia Supreme Court held that “[a] mere objection or protest, or a mere threat to take legal proceedings is not sufficient to exclude the consequences of laches or acquiescence.” However, the Bacon court identified specific factors that are to be considered by Georgia courts when applying the doctrine of laches to community association cases. Specifically, the Bacon court held that, “[i]n determining whether there has been laches, there are many factors to be considered, including the sufficiency of the excuse offered in extenuation of the delay in bringing suit.”
Additionally, factors that Georgia courts consider when applying the doctrine of laches include the amount of time it took for the violating construction to be completed, when the association became aware of the violation, the actions taken by the association once it learned of the violation, the cost incurred by the owner for said construction, the cost the owner will incur to remove the construction, the level of difficulty associated with the removal of the construction, the potential damage which could be caused by the removal of the construction, the violating owner’s knowledge of the covenants and the violating owner’s knowledge that the association objects to and seeks to prevent  the construction.
The doctrine of laches is not an absolute defense for owners who begin construction without first obtaining board approval. Georgia courts have and will require violating owners remove unauthorized construction in certain circumstances.
For example, in Hech v. Summit Oaks Owners Ass’n, Inc. 275 Ga.App. 265, 620 S.E.2d 490 (2005), the property owners erected an above ground pool in violation of the community protective covenants without first seeking and obtaining board approval.  In Hech, the owners constructed the unapproved pool in about one week.  Approximately two weeks after the construction of the pool was completed, the association contacted the owners and advised them that the pool violated the community’s protective covenants. The association repeatedly sent written notice of the violation to the owners and demanded the pool be removed. After the owners continued to ignore the association’s demands, the association filed against the owners. The lawsuit was ultimately filed approximately 13 months after the construction of the pool was completed.
The trial court agreed with the association and ordered the removal of the pool. The owners appealed the trial court’s decision and the Georgia Court of Appeals affirmed the trial court’s ruling that the owners violated the Declaration, that the doctrine of laches did not apply and that the owner must remove the unauthorized pool. Specifically, the Georgia Court of Appeals held that:
To suggest that the [Hechs] acquired equitable rights in their violations merely because they managed to build the [pool] before [the association] realized that they intended to [do so], or because [the association] tried to avoid litigation by settling the dispute within the neighborhood, is to say that any restrictive covenant can be successfully violated, even in the face of complaints, merely by expending a large sum of money to erect a structure before the complaining party can figure out what is happening or can get to the courthouse to file a lawsuit. This would stand the law of restrictive covenants on its head.
The Hech case describes a situation where the Court will require the removal of a structure even when the Association has waited until after completion of construction to file suit. However, this should be considered the exception and not the rule.  In Hech, the court operated under the assumption that the association did not have knowledge of the construction of the pool until after construction was substantially complete.
Therefore, when a significant violation is unfolding before your eyes, the best practice is to dispense with formalities and immediately notify the owner in writing of the violation and demand the owner immediately cease and desist the unauthorized construction. If the owner does not immediately cease and desist construction, the Association must immediately file a lawsuit and seek a temporary restraining order (“TRO”) from the Court.
A TRO is a judicial device which allows for an immediate hearing, sometime as quickly as the same day the lawsuit is filed.  At the hearing, the court will hear evidence from both the association and the owner in order to determine whether to enter an order requiring the owner to cease construction. The order will not address the merits of the underlying violation, but rather will address solely the issue of immediate construction.  If the court finds some evidence of fact that the construction may be a violation of the Declaration, the court will order the owner to cease construction for a maximum of 30 days.  Then, in order for the restraining order to be extended for the duration of the lawsuit, the Court must hold a full evidentiary hearing, which is basically a mini trial.  If the Court decides to extend the order requiring construction to cease it will issue what is called an Interlocutory Injunction.   If granted, an Interlocutory Injunction will remain in effect until the lawsuit is completed.
One of the advantages of the TRO is that it may be granted ex parte.  An ex parte order is one granted upon application by the association without the violator having an opportunity to present his position.  When seeking a TRO, an association is required to present evidence which establishes that the association has taken diligent effort to notify the owner that it is seeking a TRO and has taken diligent effort to provide the owner with information relative to the hearing date.   Regardless of whether the violator contests the association’s request for a TRO, a TRO is such an extraordinary remedy that it is only valid for a maximum of thirty days. This thirty day cessation of construction, however, is usually sufficient to get the owner’s attention and to resolve the violation.
In Georgia, to have a TRO expanded into an interlocutory injunction, the association must pass a three-part test established by Georgia Courts.
First, the Association must demonstrate that there is a substantial likelihood that it will win the underlying lawsuit.  Second, the Association must demonstrate to the court that a greater harm will occur to the association if the covenants are not enforced than to the violator if the injunction is granted. Third, the association must demonstrate to the court that it will suffer irreparable harm if the injunction is not granted.  While these three elements are required to obtain an Interlocutory Injunction after a full hearing with witnesses, Courts often apply the same or similar criteria when evaluation an request for a TRO.  The main difference being that the hearing for a TRO often does not have actual witness testimony and the Court generally relies on the contentions of the respective attorneys for the parties.
The first two elements required for an Interlocutory Injunction usually do not pose much difficulty to the Association seeking an Interlocutory Injunction. The third element, however, historically has been more difficult for associations to demonstrate. The demonstration to the court that the association will suffer “irreparable harm” if the injunction is not granted is sometimes a difficult burden for the association to meet.  In some situations, it is not difficult to show irreparable harm.  For example, a water leak causing continuing damage to other units in a condominium clearly meets this burden because the continued water exposure could result in unknown and substantial damage.  The immediate urgency of this type of problem helps establish irreparable harm.  However, it has often been difficult to convince a judge that a violation of a restrictive covenant in a non-emergency situation would result in irreparable harm to an association if a preliminary injunction is not granted.
Fortunately, the third requirement of proving irreparable harm to the association is no longer required.  The Georgia Court of Appeals ruled in the case Focus Entertainment International, Inc. v. Partridge Greene, Inc., that irreparable harm automatically occurs as a matter of law when a restrictive covenant is violated. With this decision, the Georgia Court of Appeals greatly simplified the process for community associations to obtain court protection to immediately stop architectural and other violations from continuing.
The point we have tried to make in this article is that an association must act swiftly when confronted with construction violations that are still in progress when discovered.  Whether the association must file a lawsuit and seek a TRO in order to avoid laches will depend on the cost and scope of construction and the cost and difficulty of removing it at a later date.  However, a good rule of thumb to is to consider that a court is likely to find laches to exist when delay in addressing a violation involves significant monetary investment and construction by the violating owner and significant cost and difficulty of removing the construction once complete.  On the other hand, a court is much less likely to find laches to exist when the modification is minor, less costly and is quickly installed and/or removed.  Regardless, once unauthorized construction is discovered a cease and desist letter should be immediately sent, them the association can evaluate whether or not the violation is of such a kind as to require a lawsuit and a TRO.  Each case is different, but all require the Association act and act swiftly.

Source:  http://www.wncwlaw.com/news/whitepapers/details.cfm?id=60

Find the Best Atlanta Property Management Company


Ten Tips for Finding the Best Atlanta Property Management Company For Your HOA.
HOA management companies in Atlanta range from the mega, big-box companies to the Mom and Pop companies run by families.  Regardless of the size of your association, you should understand the key differences in management companies and how to choose the best management for your HOA or condo association.

Here are ten things you should look for in an Atlanta HOA Management Company:

1.  Find a Locally Owned Company. Working with a locally owned and operated management company means that all management decisions originate in Atlanta and not 800 miles away.  Locally owned management companies are focused on the Atlanta market and their key vendor and banking relationships are right here in Georgia.  Best of all, if you ever have a question or concern, you can personally visit and meet with the company and its highest executive officers and inspect any and all management records.

2.  Make Sure Your Management Company Banks with a Georgia Bank. Banking locally means fewer errors in banking transactions and more efficient depositing of HOA checks without delays caused by interstate bank transactions or delayed mail processing times.  It also means that if you ever have any concerns or a need to withdraw or move funds, you can do without any delay.  If your property management company works with an out-of-state bank, you will have a longer turnaround and less access to records and money when you need it.

3. Find a Company That Delivers Financial Statements at the Beginning of Every Month. If you entrusting your company’s affairs to a management company, you have the right to receive timely and accurate financial statements every month.  If your management company is giving you full and complete financials by the 10th of every month, something is wrong.  Either they are too big and inefficient, understaffed or lack the organization they should have to effectively manage your community.   And make sure the financial statements include a Balance Sheet, Income and Expense Statement, Cash Receipts Journal, General Ledger and Check Register as well as copies of the actual bank statements.  If the management company can’t provide you with all of these basic financial documents (and many cannot), there is something wrong and you need to find another company.

4.  Insist on Complete Transparency. There is nothing magical about what management companies do and nothing should be secret from the Board.  The Board should be able to request records and get them without a runaround.  And the Board should be able to review every property inspection the company performs.  Too many companies claim they do property inspections when in reality they whistle through the neighborhood on the way to Starbucks.

5.  Make Sure You Get to Choose All Vendors. Management companies often have “sweetheart deals” with vendors that enhance their bottom line and cost the HOA more money.  So when it comes to selecting vendors and soliciting bids, make sure you are able to direct what companies you want to receive bids from and that you make the decision of who to hire.   If any management company tells you that they select all of the vendors, pack up your bags and run!

6.  Be Realistic. Management companies deal on a very low profit margin.  Think about what services you want and what you are willing to pay for.  If you want weekly property inspections, you are going to pay a lot more than a neighborhood that wants monthly property inspections.  But are weekly inspections necessary or reasonable?  Most Covenants require that associations provide homeowners a minimum of thirty days to correct a violation.  Weekly inspections would be an unnecessary waste of resources and would only increase the management costs.

7.  Look at the Company’s Insurance Before Doing Business With Them. Is your HOA property management company insured to cover your association in the event of a loss?  Do they have liability insurance in case they hit the front entrance sign on the way into the neighborhood?  Do they have an umbrella insurance policy just in case?  Do they also have fidelity coverage in case one of their employees steals from the association coffers?  Do they have workers compensation coverage in case one of their employees is hurt on the job?  If not, you probably need to find another management company.

8.  Beware of the Big Boys. Bigger management companies often have longer response times and more “red tape” to deal with.  If an Atlanta property management company has to refer your question to someone else in the company or can’t get a bill paid within five days of receiving it, you are going to be frustrated dealing with the company and the delay in response time is ultimately going to cost you time and money.  Also, lack of service and delayed responses put your Atlanta HOA, High Rise or Condo association in situations of extreme liability. If problems concerning the health and well being of the public, lets say a tripping hazard or leaking roof in a community center, aren’t addressed immediately the cost and liability associated with the problems rise exponentially.

9.  Meet the Company Representatives. You will never get a true sense of what a management company does and how companies differ from one another until you meet with representatives.  If all you are doing is collecting bids and comparing prices, you are missing the boat.  If the management company representatives aren’t “liable,” when you meet them, they sure aren’t going to get any better when they talk to homeowners.   And make sure they are willing to return all phones, not just calls from Board members, from all homeowners within 24 hours.  Many companies will give “A+” service to Board members and “D-” service to the homeowners.

10.  Visit the Company Offices Before You Decide. Worried about who you are doing business with?  There is no better way to get a sense of how your management company operates than by a personal on site visit.  Is the office clean, neat, professional and organized?  It should be if that is how they conduct business.  If the office is a disorganized mess with boxes piled everywhere and papers scattered in a heap, you may want to choose another management company.

How to Get the Most Out Of Your Property Manager and Avoid Running Off The Good Ones


How to Successfully Work With Your Property Management Company

Atlanta, GeorgiaProperty Management companies generally come in two varieties.  The really bad property management companies end up giving you little or no useful information, are not truthful about the work they perform for you (such as property inspections),  “rubber stamp” any invoice that is submitted to them and fail to look out for your community’s best interests.  The really good property management companies bend over backwards to help your community but are easily taken advantage of by overbearing Board members and are more likely to be run off.  The bad companies create Board apathy by their failure to provide any customer service and, strangely enough, oftentimes end up staying with a community for years and years because no one knows better.   So how can you make sure you are getting the service you contracted for without running off a good property management company?  Here are a five insider’s tips to avoid running off a good property management company.

1.  Don’t Make Demands Outside the Contract Terms. If your property management contract provides for monthly financials, don’t call the property manager twice a week asking for updated account receivable reports, gate access reports and updates on payments to vendors. This takes time and time is money.  The more demands you make on your property manager that are outside the terms of the contract, the more likely your contract rate is likely to be increased when it comes time to renew.  If the Board’s demands are truly excessive and overboard, the property management company will likely discourage you from re-upping for another year by raising your rates 50% or more.  Huge price increases are a sure sign that you were getting a whole lot more in services than you were paying for and that your property management  company no longer wants to represent you.

2.   Don’t Micromanage Your Property Manager. Okay this one is a no-brainer.  The quickest way to run off a good property manager is to micromanage them.  If you have a really good property management company that provides timely useful information, is completely honest about the services it performs and is always looking out for your best interests, it’s not uncommon for Board members to become overly enthusiastic about their community and all of the wonderful possibilities for its future.  But wait a minute.  Rome wasn’t built in a day and your community isn’t going to be magically transformed in an instant no matter how good your property manager is.  So step back and  remember that you are working with a property management professional who doesn’t need to be micro managed and will resent it if you do micromanage them just as you would resent it if you were being micro managed.

3.  Avoid Making Unreasonable Demands on Your Property Manager. It is not uncommon to want to rebid your landscape, pool, gate company, termite, insurance and law firm contracts.  It is unusual and unreasonable to ask your property manager to solicit new contract bids for 5 or 6 different contract services a single month.  Work out a schedule to space out your demands on your property manager to something more appropriate.  Unless you are paying for a full-time on site property manager, it is not realistic to expect to be treated like you are the only client.  If you want to be the only client, be prepared to pay a whole lot more than you are currently paying.

4.  Respond to Your Property Manager’s Emails. If you insist on being intimately involved in everything your property manager does for your community and want to review and approve every invoice,  violation letter and legal action against an owner, respond to the emails that are sent to you for input and approval.  Don’t expect your property manager to send you repeated reminders of email requests they previously sent you.   Make sure you fulfill your responsibilities to communicate on a timely basis with your property manager.  You are only going to frustrate your property manager and lose their support if you force them to send you twenty emails before you make a decision on a course of action.  Be decisive, provide clear directions and be timely in your communications with your property manager.

5.  Always Treat Your Property Manager With Respect. Everyone is entitled to be treated with respect.  Property managers are not a lower life form.  You expect to be treated with respect and your property manager deserves to be treated with respect.  Don’t get caught up in a  power trip and start treating your property manager like you own them.  They are your agent; not your servant or your secretary.  If you want to get the most out of your property manager and not be moved to the bottom of their “To Do” List, treat your property manager with the same respect and dignity that you expect.  Make sure that you don’t confuse an honest,  and oftentimes innocuous, mistake with a mortal sin.  And resist the temptation to call your property manager everyday just to talk.  You may be on a friendly basis with them but this is their job, not a form of amusement for them.   They are busy professionals and don’t need you calling them just to fill in a gap in your day.  Make sure you have a purpose for calling them and try to consolidate your requests in a single phone call or email to be more productive.

Keep in mind these few rules and you will build a productive and long lasting relationship with your property management company.

Riverside Property Management is a Homeowners and Condominium Association management company management company proudly serving Roswell, Alpharetta, Buckhead, Marietta and all of North Georgia. Riverside is also an expert Georgia association management company and high rise Atlanta association management company. To find out more about Riverside Property Management and why it is one of Georgia’s fastest growing property management companies, go to www.riversidepropertymgt.com. You’ll be glad you did.