Tag Archives: Business

A list of Do’s and Dont’s for HOA Management:


 

Community Associations

  • Customer service. Answer your calls and emails within 24 hours of receipt. Even if you don’t have an answer, let your client/homeowner know that you are working on it.
  • Know your community. Set your goals to be proactive, not reactive.
  • Be respectful. Treat that nasty, arrogant man or woman with respect; they may be your next Board President.
  • Maintain your cool. If a homeowner is calling you names and yelling, don’t take it personally. Nine times out of ten, they are just having a bad day and you have been chosen to take it out on. Surprisingly, after they have vented, they will often call you back to apologize.
  • Support staff. Acknowledge and appreciate those that are there to support you. It only takes a second to add a line to your email after they have gathered information for you to say, Hey, I appreciate all you do for me.
  • Never, ever lie. If you have forgotten or not completed a task given you by the Board, tell them I am sorry. I overlooked that directive but I will follow up immediately. The Board will understand that sometimes unforeseen things happen. If you are straight forward and provided you don’t make a habit of overlooking your assignments, they will understand.
  • Rumblings of dissatisfaction. Working for a management company means client retention. If you feel, hear or suspect any dissatisfaction, then you need to address this issue with your supervisors. What begins as a tempest in a teakettle ultimately could lead to a hurricane. Less clients for your company can mean cuts backs in the work force.
  • Ask questions. No one has all the answers all of the time. Ignorance is not bliss if you have read the documents wrong or given your Board misinformation. Better to say, I don’t have an answer at this time, but I will research the issue and report back promptly.
  • Stay focused. On the days that every call you get is from a cranky homeowner, every email seems full of hate, you feel sure that your supervisor appears to be looking at you with thoughts of terminating your employment, and you are ready to just give up. . . you might be surprised that the next call is from a homeowner or Board member telling you how much they appreciate you, the next email is one giving you a glowing reference on a job well done, or you are paged to come to the reception desk and find a floral delivery from a grateful Board/Homeowner, and you see your supervisor in the hallway and well, three out of four ain’t bad.

Riverside Property Management in Kennesaw works with homeowner and condo associations providing a variety of management, code enforcement, consulting and educational services, reserve studies, budgeting assistance and maintenance planning expertise.

 

Directions on How to Run an HOA Board Meeting


 

The Secret to Good Board Meetings.

Board meetings should be productive, efficient meetings where the board conducts business.  Are your board meetings productive and efficient? Does the board meet to conduct business or socialize? Are you getting the most out of your meetings?

Consider doing a few of these things:

Prepare a Realistic Agenda. Five page agendas with 50 objectives set out may be impressive but they are unrealistic and counter-productive.  You need to set a list of priorities for each meeting and focus on those issues.  If you have 50 issues you want to address, spread them out over the course of the year.  You will be more efficient and see better results if you are able to manage your agenda.

Set an end time to your meetings. Meetings should last no more than an hour.  Start the meeting when it is scheduled to begin and get straight to business. If you collectively have the focus to get done in an hour you’ll be amazed with how much you can accomplish. If you have no time limit, the meeting will typically drag on and a lot of time will be wasted. When time is wasted at a meeting then people are less likely to volunteer because they feel their time is wasted.  One hour meetings have a major impact on volunteers. Associations that hold focused, one hour meetings have more people volunteer. It’s also important to note that those volunteers stay active the in the community for much longer. Length of your board meetings may seem like a trivial matter, but it really does have a large impact on how the volunteers of the association view the organization and, in turn, how they view their role.

Be familiar with the Covenants and Bylaws. Key elements with which board members should familiarize themselves are the association’s governing documents that define the board’s authority. If you have a management company, they should provide guidance on your role as a board member, your fiduciary responsibility, specific board responsibilities from decision-making to administrative tasks, and how to conduct and participate in board meetings. Other vital information will include how to avoid personal liability, professional conduct at meetings, parliamentary procedures, the operating and reserve budgets, federal, state and local laws that impact your community, and appropriate insurance coverage.

Come prepared. Be familiar with the issues that will be addressed at the meeting.  If you have questions, ask them prior to the meeting so that your manager (if professionally managed) can have ample time to find the answers. This will help the meeting be more effective and brief. There is nothing more frustrating to those attending the meeting than for fellow board members to come unprepared and want to discuss issues at great length.

Make the meeting a time for action. Next, hold action oriented HOA board meetings.  Don’t just discuss issues, make decisions. Every item up for discussion should end in a vote to move forward in some way or table the issue with a clear understanding of why the item is being tabled and when it will be revisited. When taking action on an item make sure it is clear who will be responsible for getting that task completed. Ambiguity cripples a board.

Don’t be confrontational. Board members should recognize they are part of a team and not take a confrontational position with fellow board members or their management company. No one should have to work or conduct business in a hostile environment. Realize that at times you will not always agree, but take the position that even disagreement can bring compromise and consensus. Be concise with your opinion and thoughts and then be sure to listen to others. Always be respectful of your fellow board members and staff, as well as the homeowners. The tone of the board can set the tone of the community. So, if you want to have a healthy, vibrant and successful community, you should reflect that image as a board member.

Treat your Community Manager with Respect. Your community manager is your agent, not your employee. They act on behalf of the board and facilitate the decisions of the board.  Remember that they are professionals and should be treated as such. It can be detrimental to a board and its community to consistently be at odds with their management company. They are there to offer their expertise based on their experience, training and education to ensure that the board doesn’t compromise their fiduciary responsibility. A board should trust and rely on their management company’s vast experience and unlimited resources.  If your board has lost trust in the management company, have a frank discussion with the company’s CEO regarding whatever problems exist. Perhaps a different manager can restore your trust, eliminating the need to start all over with a new company.

Be a Team Player. If you recognize that, as a board member, you are part of a team of volunteers and management experts, you will be rewarded when you use those resources to make decisions that are based on sound business judgment. This, in turn, will inspire others to serve and build a team of future leaders who will want to emulate your leadership. By doing so, you will find serving on the board is not a burdensome chore, but a rewarding experience that you will value for years to come.

Be determined to have one of the best HOA’s in Atlanta by having an HOA management company that focuses on helping you have effective meetings.

 

Association Boards, Things You Should Have Learned From the News


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Here are examples of a few lessons that should have been learned by reading the newspapers:

  • There is no substitute for good financial management and a solid reserve program.

The combination of foreclosures, budget deficits, embezzlement and the inability to continue with the maintenance was felt in Community Associations across the country. Those Associations which had to cut corners, or assessments, are often found in deeper problems, and in some extreme cases, in the street. This is the time to be smart.

  • Disasters happen – do not bet the HOA that you will be spared.

The last two years have seen not only a financial disaster hit the U.S., but also a string of natural disasters that have severely affected a large number of Homeowner and Condominium Associations. Many did not have flood insurance, or increased deductible or lower limits of their insurance coverage. Many canceled special policies that covered hurricane, earthquake, wind or other things that they hoped would miss them. Too often, it was the wrong bet. As a result, some organizations simply disappeared, owners forced to leave, the units condemned, without any hope of recovery. Some had to sell the buildings damaged at a great loss and move on. Others had to live for months outside the homes in hotels with only some or none of the costs covered, while the Board has wrestled with insurance companies, contractors and the courts. Insurance is one of the most important things that boards have to deal with.  Do not bet on the future of the Association, Mother nature may try to ignore you.

  • Find a way to deal with “going green“, without confusion, expense and visibility.

In nature (and often the CC & R), Associations,  are resistant to change. But this is not going away, and the Association is almost always going to come through to look bad when they resist any change. Clothes lines, solar panels, false grass, landscaping and other items are only the beginning. Start with an owners vote on how they feel about various issues and real information (not just rumors) about how they will help and what are the options. It can be a single owner that poses a problem, but you can expect many more to follow.

  • Flags cause problems – no flags allowed at all causes even more problems.

If you allow the U.S. flag to fly on holidays with a bracket attached to the unit / home, you can almost count on someone  pushing to do more. They want to fly the flag every day, on a pole 20 feet in front of your unit / home, or a service flag for the Navy or Marine, or the stars in the windows to show a family in danger, or flag college game day, etc, etc, etc. Someone will always push the envelope. Again, just survey the residents and see what is the general consensus, which the majority will support. This is not only an individual problem, the Board must decide and then publish.

  • If you’re not active on the internet, it is very likely you will be found “on” the internet.

The number of sites created by the owner of the individual to attack or publish less than favorable information about your Association has grown exponentially. You can get on the Internet for almost no cost and see what is published can  stay forever. Transparency of operations and multiple methods of communication must be a primary consideration of the board. Do not keep putting it off. Get connected now.

  • State legislatures will cost the HOA more money unless the owners SHOW UP.

Since there is very little actual data about Associations and owners available, state legislators often act due to the squeakiest wheel, usually one or two owners who have beaten their heads with the Board. Who is really to blame rarely counts.  It is what you can give a legislator in particular. The positive exposure usually results in bills that will cost money from the owners. Boards should be aware of how legislation will impact the potential of the Association and all owners and find a way to voice their position.

Riverside Property Management, Inc. is a leading provider of financial reporting, maintenance and governance, legal collection procedures and management consulting services for Homeowners Associations and Conominiums in the Atlanta Metro area..

Our clients include homeowners associations and developers of multi-family, owner-occupied housing throughout the Atlanta Metro area.

Our team includes certified Professional Community Managers (PCAM), Licensed Real Eastate Agents (RES) and a Board Certified Collection Attorney (ESQ), licensed in Georgia, who all specialize in maintaining property condition, collection of  assessments and enforcement of existing Covenants.  Individual consultations, management reviews and educational workshops for association boards, to help improve their community governance skills.

We also provide critical budget and financial planning tools that include reserve studies and budget projections for maintenance and repair costs of community owned assets.

Detailed reserve studies and maintenance plans prepared in conjunction with our consulting architect are one of the most valuable management tools available for any association. If you are interested in long range financial planning and supervised maintenance of community assets, our services will be of benefit to your association.

Developers will find our company invaluable when planning a new construction or conversion project. Reserve studies, maintenance plans and operating budgets required for all newly formed associations are available from our company.

For more information about Riverside Property Management and the services we offer please take the time to browse our website and feel free to call our offices to speak with a licensed representative of our company.

(678) 866-1436
info@riversidepropertymgt.com

How to Run an HOA Board Meeting


The Secret to Good Board Meetings.

Board meetings should be productive, efficient meetings where the board conducts business.  Are your board meetings productive and efficient? Does the board meet to conduct business or socialize? Are you getting the most out of your meetings?

Consider doing a few of these things:

Prepare a Realistic Agenda. Five page agendas with 50 objectives set out may be impressive but they are unrealistic and counter-productive.  You need to set a list of priorities for each meeting and focus on those issues.  If you have 50 issues you want to address, spread them out over the course of the year.  You will be more efficient and see better results if you are able to manage your agenda.

Set an end time to your meetings. Meetings should last no more than an hour.  Start the meeting when it is scheduled to begin and get straight to business. If you collectively have the focus to get done in an hour you’ll be amazed with how much you can accomplish. If you have no time limit, the meeting will typically drag on and a lot of time will be wasted. When time is wasted at a meeting then people are less likely to volunteer because they feel their time is wasted.  One hour meetings have a major impact on volunteers. Associations that hold focused, one hour meetings have more people volunteer. It’s also important to note that those volunteers stay active the in the community for much longer. Length of your board meetings may seem like a trivial matter, but it really does have a large impact on how the volunteers of the association view the organization and, in turn, how they view their role.

Be familiar with the Covenants and Bylaws. Key elements with which board members should familiarize themselves are the association’s governing documents that define the board’s authority. If you have a management company, they should provide guidance on your role as a board member, your fiduciary responsibility, specific board responsibilities from decision-making to administrative tasks, and how to conduct and participate in board meetings. Other vital information will include how to avoid personal liability, professional conduct at meetings, parliamentary procedures, the operating and reserve budgets, federal, state and local laws that impact your community, and appropriate insurance coverage.

Come prepared. Be familiar with the issues that will be addressed at the meeting.  If you have questions, ask them prior to the meeting so that your manager (if professionally managed) can have ample time to find the answers. This will help the meeting be more effective and brief. There is nothing more frustrating to those attending the meeting than for fellow board members to come unprepared and want to discuss issues at great length.

Make the meeting a time for action. Next, hold action oriented HOA board meetings.  Don’t just discuss issues, make decisions. Every item up for discussion should end in a vote to move forward in some way or table the issue with a clear understanding of why the item is being tabled and when it will be revisited. When taking action on an item make sure it is clear who will be responsible for getting that task completed. Ambiguity cripples a board.

Don’t be confrontational. Board members should recognize they are part of a team and not take a confrontational position with fellow board members or their management company. No one should have to work or conduct business in a hostile environment. Realize that at times you will not always agree, but take the position that even disagreement can bring compromise and consensus. Be concise with your opinion and thoughts and then be sure to listen to others. Always be respectful of your fellow board members and staff, as well as the homeowners. The tone of the board can set the tone of the community. So, if you want to have a healthy, vibrant and successful community, you should reflect that image as a board member.

Treat your Community Manager with Respect. Your community manager is your agent, not your employee. They act on behalf of the board and facilitate the decisions of the board.  Remember that they are professionals and should be treated as such. It can be detrimental to a board and its community to consistently be at odds with their management company. They are there to offer their expertise based on their experience, training and education to ensure that the board doesn’t compromise their fiduciary responsibility. A board should trust and rely on their management company’s vast experience and unlimited resources.  If your board has lost trust in the management company, have a frank discussion with the company’s CEO regarding whatever problems exist. Perhaps a different manager can restore your trust, eliminating the need to start all over with a new company.

Be a Team Player. If you recognize that, as a board member, you are part of a team of volunteers and management experts, you will be rewarded when you use those resources to make decisions that are based on sound business judgment. This, in turn, will inspire others to serve and build a team of future leaders who will want to emulate your leadership. By doing so, you will find serving on the board is not a burdensome chore, but a rewarding experience that you will value for years to come.

Be determined to have one of the best HOA’s in Atlanta by having an HOA management company that focuses on helping you have effective meetings.

High Performing Board Practices


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The public debate on boards often focuses on catastrophic failure. In many cases, the boards actually meet the standards and follow the right policies, but were not committed enough and left to ask the right questions.

Exceptional boards center around four key concepts or practices:

Strategy
This includes being mission-driven, using strategic thinking, and maintaining of sustainable resources.

Responsibility
This includes having  compliance with integrity, being results-oriented, and promoting a spirit of transparency.

Building relationships
This includes developing a constructive partnership between the home owners and the board, ensuring revitalization, and implementing intentional board practices such as thinking about the board’s size, structure, and meetings.
Dynamic
This includes fostering a culture of openness to ensure that all voices are heard, respective practice when making decisions, and demonstrating continuous learning through guidance, education beyond the boardroom and self-evaluation of the board as a whole and the members of the Board.

The true essence of an exceptional board is in the way members of the board and homeowners are interrelated to create something much richer and more powerful than anyone can create one.

When thinking about each other’s participation differently in the meeting, you want to make sure you understand why. It is not just because of better conversations; it is because they have better information and ask better questions which lead to more robust discussions, more authentic debates, and better decision making.

By strengthening our Boards, we will have stronger organizations, and in time much stronger communities. HOA Board leadership is critical to serving the public good and the impact of our State and Country.

Trying to save money? Beware of hiring unlicensed contractors. They could be more expensive than you think.


A West Virginia man probably never thought he could be held liable for more than $1 million when he hired an electrician to replace a circuit breaker in his mother’s house.

Community Association Pool

A California community association never expected to be found responsible when a contractor’s employee was electrocuted while installing new rain gutters.

BUT THAT’S EXACTLY what happened.  In both cases the workers were unlicensed-and, the results were costly for those who hired them.

“Poor Workmanship may cause or exacerbate other problems, in some instances impairing the structural integrity of a building or improvement.  Thus, the quick and inexpensive repair may produce exactly the opposite result – increased expenses and delays.”

With escalating energy and fuel costs, increased delinquencies and bad debt resulting from current economic conditions,  Your community association board may be looking to trim expenses anywhere it can,  especially with repair and maintenance work.

Some community leaders and residents believe they can reduce costs by using day laborers or community volunteers instead of licensed contractors for such jobs.  Others might believe that licenses or permits aren’t required for smaller projects or that the permit process is a waste of time and an unnecessary expense.  Before you take another step, consider the potentially costly consequences.

BUYER BEWARE

Some of the drawbacks of using an unlicensed contractor are obvious.  Shoddy workmanship, inability to enforce warranties, lack of manufacturer warranties, damages to the property and improvements and failure of completed work to comply with applicable building codes are frequent complaints.  If the work performed by the contractor does not comply with local or state codes and ordinances, the building department or agency with jurisdiction may stop the work and, if the work is complete, require corrective work to be performed.  Corrective work may consist of hiring a licensed contractor to remove the improvement altogether or prepare and submit the documents necessary to obtain a permit.  Of course, the corrective work is an additional expense not contemplated when initially engaging the contractor.  Moreover, the local enforcement authority generally has the power to levy fines for building code violations.  The fines, which may accrue on a daily basis, may result in a lien against the property.

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Poor Workmanship may cause or exacerbate other problems, in some instances impairing the structural integrity of a building or improvement.  Thus, the quick and inexpensive repair may produce exactly the opposite result – increased expenses and delays.

Unlicensed contractors requiring large upfront payments without performing the services leave the property owners without much recourse because state recovery programs are often limited to resolving disputes with licensed contractors.  If the work is done well, is any harm done?  What about small projects that are not likely to result in building code violations or major damages, such as installing gutters, replacing a few roof tiles or hanging a ceiling fan?  Why can’t residents volunteer to help out when it comes to certain maintenance projects?  Is hiring someone who is licensed in another state such a bad idea?

UNEXPECTED CONSEQUENCES

Using an unlicensed contractor may have negative impacts that are immediate or delayed.  That’s a lesson learned by the man in West Virginia after he hired an electrician to do some work on his mother’s house.  Sometime later, a cable company employee was working on a cable attached to a nearby utility pole and fell, breaking his hip.  The cable company worker filed suit against the utility company, the cable company and this West Virginia man, the son of the owner of the property.  The injured cable worker claimed the wiring from the utility pole to the circuit breaker was faulty and later discovered that the electrician that the man had hired was not licensed to perform the work.

In a community association, all owners and residents are affected when problems result from code violations.  How would you feel if what you considered a routine project for your unit resulted in displacing almost half of the residents of your building?  Residents of a condominium development in Florida have paid dearly – both emotionally and financially – when a do-it-yourself home improvement project went awry.  A fire started in the condominium unit when an improperly mounted ceiling fan fell and created a short circuit.  An analysis revealed there was no fan box, as required by the city’s building code.  Also, the fan was attached to the drywall with just a toggle bolt instead of being secured to a ceiling joist or beam.  While the association’s master insurance policy covered most of the repair work, it did not reimburse the owners for replacement housing, furniture storage or the long, costly legal battle that ensued.

CHECK IT OUT

We require all vendors to pass a rigorous screening process before being approved to service any of the associations we manage.  Vendors are also required to provide Proof of, and continuously maintain workman’s compensation & liability coverage to avoid cancelation of their contracts.

Associations should require contractors to provide proof that they are licensed and insured.  Ask to see a copy of their license.  Ask for a copy of their liability and worker’s compensation insurance.  If the contractor won’t provide proof of insurance or the declaration page for insurance has a different name, steer clear.  You can also find out whether a contractor is licensed by going to the appropriate state agency.

Associations and consumers in general, should be suspicious if a contractor asks for a large down payment, requests payments be made to an individual rather than the company or asks that checks be made payable to “cash”.  If you are told the work doesn’t require a building permit or you’re asked to apply for the permit yourself, you should also be concerned.

Board members have a fiduciary duty to the association and its members to make decisions in good faith, as a reasonably prudent person would in similar circumstances, and in the best interest of the community.  While board members may rely upon the advice of experts, and they often have a stronger legal defense when they do so, they must insure they have the information necessary to make informed decisions.

Cutting corners-either in time or money-can have costly consequences.

Read from source at http://www.communityassociationmanagement.com/facilities-a-maintenance/vendorscontractors/202-cutting-corners.html

2011 – The Year of the Missing Money


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Published: 02 December 2011 – Written by JWW

If there was a single theme running through news stories and articles about condo and homeowner associations in 2011, it was the shortage of money to carry out their responsibilities.

First, the trend of owners not paying their association assessments due to a weak economy, continued strong, which meant that associations had less money to carry out their required operations.  Then, the foreclosure crisis also continued strong, again leaving associations short, as owners in foreclosure usually stopped paying assessments.  Those associations in states that gave them six month of assessments in a foreclosure process may have been a little better off than those in states without the lien priority, but they still found it was tough to collect.

Then, the mortgage banking industry started piling on, by slowing down foreclosures, so that they would not be responsible for a home’s assessments until the last possible minute.  This dragged out the time frame when associations were receiving no income from a unit, placing a tough burden on the owners who were paying, and on boards to struggle with reduced revenue.  Some states tried to help out associations, and some attorneys got creative in forcing foreclosures, but that was only in a few states.

The following news story leads from 2011 show a growing trend that is entirely preventable, but sadly, is often ignored:

  • FL: President of homeowners association accused of embezzlement
  • OH: Prosecutor’s filing indicates women may plead guilty to stealing $1.6M
  • NC: Parkwood president: Embezzler took at least $150K from HOA
  • WA: Former HOA president is headed to trial
  • IA: Muscatine woman gets probation for theft from homeowners’ association
  • FL: The former manager of a luxury Aventura condo building, accused of embezzling hundreds of thousands of dollars, turned herself in to jail officials.
  • LA: Former president of Montz associations pleads guilty to theft
  • TX: HOA dues disappear in elaborate scam
  • NC: Theft of money from Parkwood involves ‘many thousands of dollars’
  • CO: Embezzler involved with HOA in Aspen called a ‘habitual criminal’ by DA
  • OH: Man pleads guilty to theft possibly totaling $200,000
  • NY: Ex-school board member admits stealing funds
  • CA: Neighborhood-association embezzler is sentenced
  • ME: Convicted condo embezzler arrested
  • CA: Diablo Grande embezzlement is news to sheriff
  • WA: Prosecutors: Issaquah HOA president bilked organization
  • FL: Charge: President bilked own homeowner association
  • MD: Grand Jury Indicts In Theft Scheme Case
  • WI: Franklin police probe suspected condo association fraud
  • WA: Former Olympia-area homeowners association worker guilty of theft
  • NJ: Former property manager in Freehold Twp. accused of embezzling $75K
  • GA: Former HOA treasurer arrested
  • CA: Former Palo Alto neighborhood association admin accused of embezzling $65K
  • GA: Manager gets 3 years probation for fraud
  • NJ: Three charged with thefts from Aberdeen condo association
  • OH: Woman gets prison for bilking condo associations
  • NJ: Mother, daughter charged in scam – Indictment: Condo funds misused
  • Toronto condo owners allege massive fraud
  • NY: Dare’s role in Pastures cost association $100,000
  • VA: Fraud at Koger may tally $2 million
  • WI: Treasurer of Kansasville home owner’s association reportedly forged checks
  • FL: Four charged in multi-million dollar fraud scheme at Hallandale Beach condo
  • NJ: Readington condo official admits stealing $200K
  • PA: $600K Swiped From Montco Condo Association
  • CA: Sheriff’s Deputy Who Took Money From HOA Sentenced
  • FL: Four charged in multi-million dollar fraud scheme at Hallandale Beach condo
  • FL: HOA bookkeeper confesses to embezzling
  • CA: Manager steals $70K from neighborhood group
  • SC: Woman charged with embezzling $14K in HOA funds
  • IN: Mishawaka embezzler to testify against co-defendant
  • IL: Regent Realty owners indicted in fraud
  • NY: Green Mansions Manager Indicted For $162K Theft
  • MA: Yarmouth condo office manager sent to jail
  • WY: Embezzler gets lengthy sentence in Fox Park case

When times are tough, people who need money will justify taking it from others. Every community association related blog and web site wrote articles about how to prevent theft, but, as with anything, there have to be people in place who will actually do the checks to see that everything is as it should be.

The result of all of this, was all too often, delayed or ignored maintenance, assessments increasing to cover revenue shortfalls, a lot of hard feelings and a lot of litigation, all of which will have long-term effects on associations. To be honest, I don’t really see any improvement in the short term, and for the long term, that is going to depend heavily on the economy, and whether or not the housing industry rebounds.

When I used to do seminars for association board members, I would tell them that it wasn’t their job to keep assessments low, but to spend the money wisely. After this year, I think I need to change that to:

It’s your job to collect the money efficiently, watch over it like a guard dog, and then, spend it wisely!

To all of you who donate your time and talents to keep your association going through these tough times:

THANK YOU!

Courtesy of: http://communityassociationsnetwork.com/wordpress/?p=332

With over 40 years of combined industry experience, the Executive Staff of Riverside Property Management  knows that the most successful communities are those where there is a sense of unity and pride among the membership; this unity and pride begins with a firm foundation comprised of:

Well defined policies and objectives
A strategic plan and future vision
A proactive Management team
Mutual team trust and respect
Timely and open communication
Excellent customer service
Industry knowledge
“Out of the Box” Thinking
Services designed to meet your needs

Give us fifteen minutes of your time and we can show you how to put your community on a fast track to success; if you don’t believe us, feel free to call upon any one of our satisfied clients. (678) 866-1436 or info@riversidepropertymgt.com

The Dynamics of an Association Board


November 21, 2011 — HOA Management Solutions | Edit

How the Board of Directors (BOD) members  interact says a lot about the state of a condominium or homeowners association.

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Leadership is the ability to do things by encouraging and channeling the contributions of others, take a position on and address the issues, and acting as a catalyst for change and continuous improvement.

Yesterday’s leaders in for-profit businesses could demand performance.  Today we face a more educated workforce that is democratically oriented. In a volunteer organization, as a condominium or homeowners association BOD, problems and opportunities can be even more complex and challenging. As a result, today’s BoD must promote and implement the contributions of all members, both individually and in groups.

Here are some ways in which members of  the BoD can initiate effective and ineffective actions:

Ineffective teams: People shield those in power from unpleasant facts, fearful of penalties and criticism for shining light on the rough realities

Effective teams: People bring forth grim facts—”Come here and look — this is ugly”—to be discussed; leaders never criticize those who bring forth harsh realities

Ineffective teams: People assert strong opinions without providing data, evidence, or a solid argument

Effective teams: People bring data, evidence, logic, and solid arguments to the discussion

Ineffective teams: The BoD president has a very low questions-to-statements ratio, avoiding critical input and/or allowing sloppy reasoning and unsupported opinions

Effective teams: The BoD president employs a Socratic style, using a high questions-to-statements ratio, challenging people, and pushing for penetrating insights

Ineffective teams: Team members acquiesce to a decision but don’t unify to make the decision successful—or worse, undermine it after the fact

Effective teams: Board members unify behind a decision once made, and then work to make the decision succeed, even if they vigorously disagreed with it

Ineffective teams: Team members seek as much credit as possible for themselves, yet do not enjoy the confidence and admiration of their peers

Effective teams: Each Board member credits other people for success, yet enjoys the confidence and admiration of his or her peers

Ineffective teams: Team members argue to look smart or to further their own interests rather than argue to find the best answers to support the overall cause

Effective teams: Team members argue and debate, not to improve their personal position but to find the best answers to support the overall cause

Ineffective teams: The team conducts “autopsies with blame,” seeking culprits rather than wisdom

Effective teams: The team conducts “autopsies without blame,” mining wisdom from painful experiences

Ineffective teams: Team members often fail to deliver exceptional results and blame other people or outside factors for setbacks, mistakes, and failures

Effective teams: Each team member delivers exceptional results, yet in the event of a setback each accepts full responsibility and learns from mistakes

The Top 10 Questions to Ask Your Prospective Community Association Management Company


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1. How many households (or units) are each community manager responsible for in your company?

Throughout the industry, Homeowners Association Management Company overload their community managers, giving them too many homeowners associations operate. The industry average is about 1,800 houses by the  community manager, which is about 500 too many homes. If the portfolio manager of a community is very large, some of the clients in the  HOA can be neglected.

2. How many people support the administrator of the community in their efforts?

A management company HOA should not only assign an administrator to a community homeowners association, but a team of people to operate smoothly for the association. A well organized team should include a community manager, accounting manager, a compliance inspector, a customer service representative, and a director of community management .

3. Is the community regularly inspected? How often? Who answers the phone when the community manager is absent or inspecting the property?

The homeowners association must be inspected for violations at least once a month. The compliance inspector should take a picture of the violation, which is sent with the letters of violation.

4. How long does your team take to respond to calls and emails?

The management company must respond to homeowners and the homeowners association board members correspondence as soon as possible, usually within 24 hours. However, Board members must also have the number of community manager’s cell phone for emergencies.

5. Does the community manager have a college degree and / or industry certifications?

Directors of the community must be college educated. They must have training and industry designation as well. Community managers must also attend seminars and industry events to stay current on changes in legislation.

6. Does the management company aggressively pursue homeowners who do not make payments on time for collection?

It is the responsibility of an owner to pay HOA dues in accordance with the rules of the homeowners association. However, when an owner fails to pay their dues, it is the responsibility of the management company to collect the funds. The board of the directors should work with the management company to delineate an HOA collection policy, including the final letters, notices of demand and eventual liening of the home.

7. Is a community web site included in our monthly management fee?

A website for your community association is a great way to help build a sense of community throughout your neighborhood. Other features should include access to forms, governing documents, closing forms, payment online access and emergency contact.  There should also be an option for accounting integration.

8. What hours can the property manager be reached?

A community manager should be available 24 hours a day. During the day which should be available through the office phone, email and cell phone and in the evenings and weekends, the management company HOA must provide an emergency service response, if a situation becomes an emergency.

9. Does the management closing account information before being transferred (sold) from one owner to another?

When a request is escrow by a title company, this information should be shared with the title company and documented in the system of the management company.

10. It is the management company Owners Association a professional team of experts?

The management company should be a team of experts with experience in professionalism and a commitment to quality service in order to properly service its customers the homeowners association.

With over 40 years of combined industry experience, the Executive Staff of Riverside Property Management  knows that the most successful communities are those where there is a sense of unity and pride among the membership; this unity and pride begins with a firm foundation comprised of:

Well defined policies and objectives
A strategic plan and future vision
A proactive Management team
Mutual team trust and respect
Timely and open communication
Excellent customer service
Industry knowledge
“Out of the Box” Thinking
Services designed to meet your needs

Give us fifteen minutes of your time and we can show you how to put your community on a fast track to success; if you don’t believe us, feel free to call upon any one of our satisfied clients.